Retro/Classic Feed

A Family Guy Salute To GoldenEye 007

Family Guy - GoldenEye 007Family Guy has skewered pop culture for two decades and I always laugh the most when the production team sets their sights on a classic video game.  In Season 17's "Griffin Winter Games", Peter Griffin and his daughter Meg are captured while trespassing in North Korea and must stage a thrilling escape in the style of a nostalgic video game.  Peter suggests they use Rare's famed GoldenEye 007 for the Nintendo 64 as their inspiration, and what follows is a loving tribute to the console's most beloved shooters.  From the ammo count in the lower left corner of the screen to the targeting reticule that appears when Meg needs to target bolts to shoot open a grate to the little cinematic cut scenes, Family Guy knows the source material and has fun with it.  Peter even offers fun observations about the gameplay and environment while they make their escape.  It's an unexpected moment that will make GoldenEye fans smile.


How High Can This Donkey Kong Shelf Get?

Donkey Kong shelf

Since the dawn of time, humanity has had a single collective dream: to have a wall-mounted shelf that resembles a stage from Donkey Kong and to stock that shelf with little 8-bit stylized figurines of Nintendo characters.  Now I have achieved this dream.  Gaze upon the Donkey Kong shelf and the tableau it presents with Donkey Kong himself on the top level guarding both Princess Toadstool and a classic Donkey Kong arcade machine (it lights up and plays sound, too!).  Mario and Luigi are on their way to save the day and maybe earn a free game, plus Toad and Link are heading up the rear for backup.  A lone Goomba patrols the lower level; sadly, Link is the one hero on the scene who cannot jump, so maybe the Goomba has a fighting chance.  Also, Gizmo the mogwai from Gremlins has stumbled into the scene and is hanging from a ladder for no reason other than he looks cute doing it.  Hang on, Gizmo! 

Special thanks and appreciation to my girlfriend who spotted the basic shelves at IKEA and painted them to something more appropriate for a big gorilla.  Acquiring the figurines was a costly chore as several of them have been out of print for some time.  Amazon to the rescue, naturally, but it took patience and time to wait for a third-party seller who wasn't charging outrageous prices for essentially an $8 chunk of plastic.  Seriously, resellers, when it comes to pricing, how high can you get?


Rare Comments About NES Castlevania Developer Explain So Much

CastlevaniaToday it's common for video game developers to speak up about their work either in unofficial forums such as social media or in proper interviews in publications, but thirty years ago nobody in a position of journalism power cared much about what a developer had to say.  We've gnawed modern games like Super Mario Odyssey to the bone, but so many older games never had a chance to shine in a development context.  One of those large voids in gaming history is the original Castlevania trilogy for the Nintendo Entertainment System as Konami isn't exactly known for keeping up with their own history until very recently, but thankfully for us there's a translated series of tweets at Shmuplations discussing the original creator of Castlevania, Hitoshi Akamatsu, that covers so much about how the game was conceived, balanced, and expanded upon in sequels.

Akamatsu’s sense of game design was very deep. In Castlevania, the knife appears first so the player can get used to the subweapons. He made the stopwatch so you could get used to enemy attacks. Then the strongest items are the Cross and the Holy Water. And that was how he determined the order in which the items would appear to the player.

I once asked him about the fight with Death, and how insanely hard it was. He told me, “The game design idea there was to get players to understand how to use the cross and axe subweapons. If you can defeat him with only the whip, that means you’re really good.” I can’t defeat him with the whip alone. But if you read the movements of the sickles, I understand it is possible (albeit very difficult) to beat him with just the whip. Apparently the test players were able to do it.

I'm reminded of how World 1-1 of Super Mario Bros. is designed in such a way with power-up and enemy placement to teach players what the game expects of them.  There's so much more in this article that reveals that those original NES games operated at a deeper level than many of us ever expected such as foreshadowing in the first Castlevania that leads into the sequel Simon's Quest, what Dracula's true form really means, and how the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles nearly hobbled the series.  Settle in and prepare to have all those little questions that you never knew you had answered.  While you're doing that, I think I'll go and play Castlevania yet again.


Begging For Street Fighter II Bosses

Street Fighter II: The World WarriorI know it's hard to believe now in an age where Street Fighter fans have been able to play as M. Bison and Balrog for decades, but there was once a time when the four Shadaloo bosses were restricted to CPU control only.  They were fruits you must not taste in the original release of Street Fighter II: The World Warrior in the arcades and that limitation carried over to the Super NES home version.  Still, that didn't stop eager players from being absolutely sure that there had to be some hidden code that would unlock Vega, Sagat, and the rest as playable characters.  Electronic Gaming Monthly used its reader mail column back in 1993 to try and convince players that there was no secret boss code no matter how many kids in the schoolyard said otherwise.  They did find Game Genie codes that could brute force access to the bosses, but that's not quite the same thing, and the "Champion Edition" mirror match Down R Up L Y B code certainly didn't get the job done either.

Electronic Gaming Monthly

I remember playing Street Fighter II for the Super NES the summer it came out with a neighborhood friend and we spent too many afternoons just trying to get to the bosses at all, let alone trying to control them.  The challenge with the bosses was that unlike the regular World Warriors, we couldn't practice their moves to understand their strategies in a controlled two-player environment.  When Vega leaped up onto his fence and flipped down on us, we had no idea what was coming or what to do about it.  Sagat's endless "TIGER!  TIGER!  TIGER UPPERCUT!"?  Forget about it.  We were strangers in a strange land and no amount of jamming on the punch buttons to electrify Blanka could save us.

(via Reddit)


Power Button - Episode 288: Everybody Announces Everything

Power ButtonIt's been quite a week for video game news as it feels like everyone had something to announce.  Sony teased us with the first peek at the concept for the PlayStation 5, Microsoft introduced a new Xbox One S variant that lacks a disc drive, Nintendo dropped version 3.0 of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate featuring Joker from Persona 5, and Capcom baffled everyone with their confusing arcade stick home console box.  Join us for an hour as we discuss all of these stories and more.   Download this week's episode directly from PTB, listen with the player below, find us on Stitcher, subscribe via iTunes and Google Play, toss this RSS feed into your podcast aggregation software of choice, and be sure to catch up on past episodes if you're joining us late. Remember that you can reach us via , you can leave a message on the Power Button hotline by calling (720) 722-2781, and you can even follow us on Twitter at @PressTheButtons and @GrundyTheMan, or for just podcast updates, @ThePowerButton. We also have a tip jar if you'd like to kick a dollar or two of support our way. 


Explore Nintendo's Virtual Boy From Start To Finish

Virtual BoyWith virtual reality making a resurgence in the past few years with companies like Sony, Oculus, and HTC leading the modern wave of headsets, it's only natural to take a look back to the 1990s when VR first tried to break out in a major way.  While Nintendo's failed Virtual Boy wasn't exactly true VR, it did gain a reputation for being something unique, special, and painful on the eyes.  In this vintage article from Benj Edwards we can explore the genesis of the hardware from a little company aiming to create private PC displays all the way to Nintendo's big gamble.  Fun fact: Sega checked out the prototype hardware and passed on it for safety and marketing reasons.

“A big issue was kids got sick, threw up, or fell over when using this,” remembers Tom Kalinske, the former president of Sega of America, which encountered the Private Eye while reviewing potential VR technology in the early 1990s. “We couldn’t take that chance.” But that wasn’t the only downside Sega saw. “As I recall, our problem with it was it was just one color,” says Kalinske. “We were already promoting Game Gear in all colors.”

Nintendo later faced similar safety issues and was afraid of kids playing Virtual Boy in the backseat of cars getting into wrecks which would shove all of the hardware's plastic and glass into a child's face at point blank range.  That's a reasonable fear!  Design limitations and compromises continued to chip away at what Virtual Boy could have been until eventually it became the product that we know and love.  At least, I love mine.  I bought a used VB off of eBay in 2003 before the big retro push drove up the prices on all things related to the system as well as a decent library of games.  I keep it stored safely in a large wooden Super Mario trunk and take it out sometimes to bewilder friends and family with it.  People who weren't paying attention to Virtual Boy in 1995 are always surprised when I set it up and tell them to stick their face into the viewing area.  Whether that's a good kind of surprise or a bad kind of surprise is left to your imagination.


Power Button - Episode 283: Wii Shop Channel Ends, Bungie Meets Its Destiny, and Anthem Performs

Power ButtonWe took January off due to busy schedules and terrible illnesses, but we're back and ready to go again by catching up on three big happenings from last month that we have talked about had we been producing new episodes.  First off we bid farewell to the recently closed Wii Shop Channel and cover one last run through the store's virtual aisles.  Next we hit Bungie and Activision calling it quits as Destiny returns home to its creators.  Finally, Blake Grundman takes us behind the scenes to discuss the Anthem preview event he recently attended at an Electronic Arts facility.  It's an hour of catching up on things.   Download this week's episode directly from PTB, listen with the player below, find us on Stitcher, subscribe via iTunes and Google Play, toss this RSS feed into your podcast aggregation software of choice, and be sure to catch up on past episodes if you're joining us late. Remember that you can reach us via , you can leave a message on the Power Button hotline by calling (720) 722-2781, and you can even follow us on Twitter at @PressTheButtons and @GrundyTheMan, or for just podcast updates, @ThePowerButton. We also have a tip jar if you'd like to kick a dollar or two of support our way. 


Video Games Live Covers EarthBound

EarthboundWhen you weren't paying attention late last year, Video Games Live released a new album, Level 6, that covers a variety of songs from games such as Tomb Raider, classic arcade titles, Pokemon, Final Fantasy X, and lots of other fan favorites, but if you want a track off the album that will give you chills, then you'll have to turn to the medley of songs from Nintendo's classic EarthBound.  Featuring a rousing start with Onett's theme before segueing into "Smiles and Tears" with an operatic element then beyond, this track is going places.  First you'll smile, then you'll get a little misty-eyed.  I mean, "Smiles and Tears" does kind of warn you that will happen.  "Local survey shows most popular career among kids in Onett is adventurer."


Sonic Mania Developer Shares Darkwing Duck Pitch

Darkwing Duck

Capcom's Darkwing Duck for the Nintendo Entertainment System found new life for modern hardware in The Disney Afternoon Collection this generation, but many fans of the classic cartoon character hoped for a full-on DuckTales Remastered type of experience that could revitalize the brand.  One of those fans, Simon "Stealth" Thomley from Headcannon who was part of the team behind Sega's acclaimed Sonic Mania, had the chance to discuss the idea with representatives from Capcom at a recent E3 and worked with his team as well as Darkwing Duck writer Aaron Sparrow and artist James Silvani on an example pitch for a new Darkwing Duck adventure that would bridge the gap between the end of the 1990s cartoon and the relaunched storyline from "The Duck Knight Returns" comic book series.  Steelbeak, Taurus Bulba, and the Fearsome Five would have been featured as the game's villains.  Unfortunately, Thomley met with dead ends and silence after that initial interest, but that didn't stop him from releasing the pitch as a free single level demo of a reworked take on Liquidator's sewer level from the original game.  Check out these YouTube videos in which Thomley tells the story of the pitch and then plays through the entire level.

 

There are new elements in this pitch that set it apart from the original NES game.  The most significant inclusion has to be Darkwing's grapple gun that was a fixture of the cartoon, but not seen in the original game.  It's a shame that Capcom passed on this idea and that, accordingly to Thomley's sources, Disney is not interested in pursuing anything like this.  With Darkwing now reworked as a fictional character within the world of its DuckTales reboot and the cancellation of Darkwing's monthly comic book set in the continuity of the original cartoon, I fear the old Darkwing is well and truly gone.  That's a terrible shame, because I would have bought something like this without hesitation.


Power Button - Episode 281: 2018's Biggest News Revisited

Power ButtonAs another year draws to a close we have invited our old friend Ross Polly back to the show to help us recap the biggest gaming news of 2018.  Classic mini consoles rise and fall, games as a service also means games with advertisements, a major console producer hoovers up smaller studios, and so much more this year it's a wonder that we can fit it all into a little over an hour, but we do.  Join us to help wrap things up.   Download this week's episode directly from PTB, listen with the player below, find us on Stitcher, subscribe via iTunes and Google Play, toss this RSS feed into your podcast aggregation software of choice, and be sure to catch up on past episodes if you're joining us late. Remember that you can reach us via , you can leave a message on the Power Button hotline by calling (720) 722-2781, and you can even follow us on Twitter at @PressTheButtons and @GrundyTheMan, or for just podcast updates, @ThePowerButton. We also have a tip jar if you'd like to kick a dollar or two of support our way.