Retro/Classic Feed

Super Game Boy Borders Frame The Action

Wario Land 2Nintendo's Super Game Boy accessory for the Super NES allowed Game Boy games to play on a proper television screen instead of the native hardware's tiny little viewing window.  Games that supported the SGB featured special colorful borders that surrounded the game action to fill out what would otherwise be a dead zone lacking activity.  The VGMuseum (which recently gave us a gallery of incompatible warning screens for the Game Boy) offers up this collection of Super Game Boy borders spanning favorites like Donkey Kong, Wario Land 2, and Mega Man V to international releases and even secret hidden borders from games such as Tetris 2 and Bomberman Quest.  Gaze knowingly at all kinds of detailed, fun artwork that few have seen in the wild.  It's a shame that the Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console service doesn't include support for these borders and other SGB features.  There's some fun stuff locked away in these games.  


Secret Origins: Castlevania II: Belmont's Revenge

BelmontHere on Halloween, you get a story about Hanukkah.  By the time 1991 rolled around, I was ten years old and deeply entrenched into the world of Nintendo.  I'd owned a Nintendo Entertainment System for several years, happily played Game Boy, and was dreaming of a Super NES for the holidays.  I was a young man of Mario.  My parents were happy to encourage this, giving me games and Nintendo-related books and media for holiday gifts and allowing me to spend my allowance and other savings on more games.  My father's side of the family, however, was not so understanding.  Ever since I had been bitten by the gaming bug a few years prior, they went out of their way to discourage my gaming interests.  They refused to give me games as gifts and even tried to forbid me from ducking away to a corner chair to play Game Boy when my family would visit them.  The terrible thing was, my grandparents never wanted much to do with me and, from my point of view, did not understand me.  From a very young age, they never wanted to talk to me or were curious about my interests.  Any attempt I made to connect with them was rebuffed.   My grandfather spoke sharply about me or over me, mostly barking to my father why I always had my face in "that damn game".  I did my best to ignore them and go back to Super Mario Land.  "It's a waste of his time!  It'll never get him anywhere!"

Continue reading "Secret Origins: Castlevania II: Belmont's Revenge" »


Power Button - Episode 221: My Pet Monster

Power ButtonVideo games and monsters go hand in hand, so on this Halloween episode of the Power Button podcast, Blake Grundman and I spend an our discussing some of our favorite video game monsters.  From Gergoth to gremlins and beyond, we're going to scare the hell out of you.   Download this week's episode directly from PTB, listen with the player below, find us on Stitcher, subscribe via iTunes and Google Play, toss this RSS feed into your podcast aggregation software of choice, and be sure to catch up on past episodes if you're joining us late. Remember that you can reach us via , you can leave a message on the Power Button hotline by calling (720) 722-2781, and you can even follow us on Twitter at @PressTheButtons and @GrundyTheMan, or for just podcast updates, @ThePowerButton.


New Donkey Kong Development Tales Revealed

Donkey KongYou'd think we'd know all there is to know about Nintendo's smash hit Donkey Kong by now, but the stories keep coming thanks to developer Shigeru Miyamoto and the re-release of the pared-down Nintendo Entertainment System version of the game via the NES Classic MiniChris Kohler at Wired has the translated details of an interview in Japanese from Nintendo's website in which Miyamoto discusses his nude creative process, his devotion to the early days of NES development, and that the arcade version of Donkey Kong was supposed to include voice clips.

“The lady stolen away by Donkey Kong was supposed to yell out, ‘Help, Help!’ And when Mario jumped over a barrel, she was supposed to yell, ‘Nice!,’ complimenting him. But some people within the company said, ‘Doesn’t the pronunciation sound a little weird?’ So we tested it on a native English speaker, a professor. They said it sounded like she was talking about seaweed: ‘Kelp, Kelp!'”

“At that point in development, we couldn’t fix it,” Miyamoto said. “So we took out all of the voices. “Help!” was replaced with Donkey Kong’s growl, and “Nice!” was replaced with the pi-ro-po-pon-pon! sound. It’s really good that we went with pi-ro-po-pon-pon. When you walk past an arcade and hear that sound, it’s really catchy. So even though we took out the voices, it still had great results. From this experience, I learned the importance of having good sound effects.”

I can't say that I miss the voice clips (you can hear them for yourself at The Cutting Room Floor), although my primary exposure to Donkey Kong was the 1994 Game Boy version which built upon the original arcade game.  The Super Game Boy version of that game includes voice clips, but in my mind I always hear the Game Boy version's take on Pauline's screams for help as a tinny soprano warble.  I suppose it all depends on which version you knew first.  On a related note, I am glad that Miyamoto is still telling these kinds of development stories about his earliest creations.  If he's held back new Donkey Kong tales, what are we still missing regarding Super Mario Bros. 3 or Zelda II: The Adventure Of Link?   


Power Button - Episode 219: An Appointment With Disappointment

Power ButtonNot every video game can be a solid, fun experience that lives up to the pre-release hype.  On this week's episode of Power Button, Blake Grundman and I discuss some of our most glaring gaming disappointments from over the years spanning Mario Is Missing, SimCity (2013), Ren & Stimpy games such as Space Cadet Adventures and Fire Dogs, Destiny, and many more.   Download this week's episode directly from PTB, listen with the player below, find us on Stitcher, subscribe via iTunes, toss this RSS feed into your podcast aggregation software of choice, and be sure to catch up on past episodes if you're joining us late. Remember that you can reach us via , you can leave a message on the Power Button hotline by calling (720) 722-2781, and you can even follow us on Twitter at @PressTheButtons and @GrundyTheMan, or for just podcast updates, @ThePowerButton.


The Incompatible Gallery

Donkey Kong CountryChances are that if you're purchasing a game for a particular console, you won't try to jam it into a different console with the expectation that it'll work.  Sometimes backwards compatibility comes into play though, and on occassion you can take a game from an older generation and play it in a newer generation machine.  It doesn't work the other way around.  Nothing good will come of slipping a Wii U disc into a Wii, for instance, nor does playing a PC Engine Super CD game with the wrong system card inserted.  The lines used to be a little blurrier though.  Consider the Game Boy Color, a handheld system that played both classic Game Boy games, fancy Game Boy Color games, and games designed for both pieces of hardware.  It could be confusing to remember which kinds of games worked in which versions of the hardware, so games that only worked on the Color model could be inserted into the original Game Boy despite the fact that those games would not play.  What's a developer to do?  Include an error screen that tells the player to try the game again on a Game Boy Color.  Now there's a full visual catalog of these error screens over at VGMuseum in which you can experience the thrill of incompatibility for yourself for the Game Boy, Neo Geo Pocket, and WonderSwan.  Most of the images are plain text, some include the stylish game logo, and a few go above and beyond with comical little scenes.


Pickin' Colors With Mario Paint

Mario PaintSpend enough time with Mario Paint for the Super NES and the game's title theme song will become lodged in your brain.  It happens so easily since the song is happy, catchy, and toe-tappingly perky.  Video game music site OverClocked Remix strikes again with "Pickin' Colors": Steve Snider's live performance of the Mario Paint theme done in a bluegrass style with actual mandolins, banjo, guitar, and bass.  Here's OCR's David Lloyd commenting on the performance:

The source lends itself surprisingly well to the rhythm & feel of such "old time" music, and while the arrangement repeats itself a bit & judges had some minor recording gripes, the unanimous feeling was that this revised version represents a creative, expressive, and most of all FUN take on the theme.


Power Button - Episode 218: Experience Gaps

Power ButtonWith so many video games out there and more releasing all the time, it's to be expected that nobody can play them all.  We all miss out on titles, sometimes with regret.  On this week's new episode of Power Button, Blake Grundman and I discuss the games that we've always wanted to play, but for one reason for another just never have.  Join us as we have not played games such as Metal Gear Solid, Kingdom Hearts, Mother 3, and Actraiser.  Maybe we'll get around to them some day.   Download this week's episode directly from PTB, listen with the player below, find us on Stitcher, subscribe via iTunes, toss this RSS feed into your podcast aggregation software of choice, and be sure to catch up on past episodes if you're joining us late. Remember that you can reach us via , you can leave a message on the Power Button hotline by calling (720) 722-2781, and you can even follow us on Twitter at @PressTheButtons and @GrundyTheMan, or for just podcast updates, @ThePowerButton.


The Astounding Secret Of The Castlevania Fish Men

CastlevaniaThe Fish Men of Konami's beloved Castlevania have been frustrating and irritating players since the franchise's debut in 1986.  One minute you're walking along a rickety platform above one of those bottomless pits of water that Dracula's civil engineer designed in his castle, the next you're knocked backward into the abyss by the arrival of a Fish Man leaping up from the depths.  How do they always seem to know where you are?  Can they be avoided?  Do they have a hidden tell you could use to determine where one may next appear?  As it turns out, the Fish Men completely give away their routine if you know where to look.  Chances are that you've seen it for thirty years now and just never noticed.  JHarris at MetaFilter, as part of an amazing comment on the behavior of some of the original Castlevania's enemies such as Medusa Heads and Bats, explains how you too can learn to safely dodge the Fish Men.

Example 2: The fishmen in Stage 10.

The first stage of this block is the flooded passage level, the one where you have to jump between precarious moving platforms, dealing with ill-timed bats, and sometimes fishmen jumping out terrifyingly close to you.

Like medusa heads, they always come out on a timer, and there is actually nothing random about their behavior. And the first loop through the game, fishmen are actually somewhat courteous, and will never leap into the air directly beneath your location. You still have to deal with their descent, though, and the bats attacking, and fireballs spat by fishmen who have landed on solid ground. Stage 10 is a notorious sticking place for many players.

When you beat the game and come back to Block 4 on the second loop, the difficulty is jacked up quite a bit. Actually, the increased difficulty really only holds for the first four blocks; Blocks 5 and 6 are nearly identical to the first loop. So, Block 4 is really the game's last stand. If you can consistently beat it and everything up to it, you have defeated Castlevania.

Perhaps because of this, the fishmen in Block 4 no longer kindly avoid leaping out of the water if you're directly over them. The only way to avoid dying to them is knowing where they'll leap from, and just not being over that spot at the moment they spawn.

Unfair, right? Having to memorize an obscure series of locations and constantly making sure you're not over one when the fatal leap occurs, right? How is a player supposed to know that?

Well it turns out, there is a tell to the fishmen's spawn locations in this stage. When I first noticed it, I thought to myself, how diabolical. Once you realize it, you'll never forget their spawn locations again. It works in the first loop too, but it's less essential. Here it is. This is a spoiler, but you probably won't notice yourself your first dozen games anyway:

With two exceptions, fishmen can only spawn directly beneath candle locations.

If you whip a candle, fishmen can still spawn there, although if you're wise you've already on the move forward. This is a tremendous aid to getting through Castlevania's most chaotic level. The two exceptions are both at the moving platforms with the low-overhang ceilings, which is important because you have to duck to get through those places because the ceiling is so low, and so, if a fishman leaps beneath you, you take the damage but the ceiling keeps you on the platform!

Now you too know the secret knowledge driving the Fish Men.  Use it wisely.


Nintendo Bringing Famicom Mini To Japan

Famicom MiniNorth America and Europe have buzzed about the upcoming Classic NES Mini from Nintendo featuring thirty of the most beloved games from the 8-bit era, but now Japan is getting in on the fun with the counterpart Famicom Mini.  Releasing November 10 for ¥5980, the little console features the same basic premise as the Classic NES but localized to match its homeland.  Mike Williams at USgamer outlines which of the included thirty games differ from the international release.

Notable new titles include Yie Ar Kung-Fu, Solomon's Key, Final Fantasy III, Mario Club Golf, River City Ransom, Downtown Nekketsu Koushinkyoku: Soreyuke Daiundoukai, Atlantis no Nazo, and Tsuppari Ozumo. The games that are exclusive to the NES Classic include Bubble Bobble, Castlevania 2, Donkey Kong Jr, Final Fantasy, Kid Icarus, Punch Out, Startropics, and Tecmo Bowl.

Also note that the Famicom Mini's controllers are hard-wired to the console just like the original Famicom's controllers, so there are differences between the two consoles besides just the exterior appearance.  I think that North America and Europe are getting the better selection of games here, although I say that as someone from North America who grew up with games like Punch Out and Bubble Bobble instead of Downtown Nekketsu Koushinkyoku: Soreyuke Daiundoukai and Atlantis no Nazo.  Either way, I'm happy to see that Japanese Nintendo fans (or international Famicom fans who want to import) won't be left out of the fun.